Griffith University - K2fly - Enterprise SaaS
Partnership

Griffith University

“This project will help cement Australia as a world leader in rock art analysis and management.”

Professor Carolyn Evans
Griffith University Vice Chancellor and President

K2fly has partnered with Griffith University and The Keeping Place to deliver a new cultural heritage management system designed to map ancient indigenous rock art. Spanning Cape York Peninsula’s enormous Laura Sandstone Basin, the region hosts one of the richest bodies of rock art in Australia. The joint project aims to record the rock art for future generations and help provide a framework for its sustainable management.

Griffith says the southern rim of Queensland’s rugged Laura Sandstone Basin in Cape York Peninsula hosts one of the richest bodies of rock art in Australia and the world. It documents the ways of life of generations of Aboriginal Australians from their original settlement, through major environmental changes, to European settlement.

The massive region, known as Quinkan Country, covers an onshore area of about 18,000 square km. Much of it is jointly managed as National Parks by Traditional Owners and remains virtually unexplored archaeologically. The major mapping project that forms part of the Australian Research Council Linkage Project aims to record the rock art for future generations and help provide a framework for its sustainable management.

The project will run for five years and will involve an extensive network of partners involving six Australian universities working with eight industry partners, which include six Aboriginal corporations, a Queensland government agency and a private business who will work together to systematically map, document and analyse the cultural heritage and rock art of the Laura Sandstone Basin.